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Updated: 56 min 43 sec ago

Spain: No Country for the Populist Radical Right?

Sun, 02/08/2015 - 08:56
Spain: No Country for the Populist Radical Right? Alonso, Sonia; Kaltwasser, Cristobal Rovira Although there is growing research interest in populist radical right (PRR) parties in Western Europe, little attention has been paid to the case of Spain – a country where these parties are almost non-existent or irrelevant from an electoral and political point of view. In a nutshell, we maintain that in contemporary Spain there is real demand for PRR parties, but three supply-side factors are impeding their electoral breakthrough and persistence: the cleavage structure of the country, the strategy of competition of the mainstream right and the electoral system. At the same time, we postulate that at least in the case of Spain the Great Recession has not improved the electoral odds of the PRR as such but rather facilitated the emergence of leftist populist forces. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13608746.2014.985448

Between Barbarism and Civilization: Librarians, Tattoos, and Social Imaginaries

Fri, 01/30/2015 - 14:50
Between Barbarism and Civilization: Librarians, Tattoos, and Social Imaginaries Pappas, Erin

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead: A Study of Theatrical Determinism

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:31
Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead: A Study of Theatrical Determinism Gross, Ben

Innovation on the Danube and Loyalty in the Habsburg Empire

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:30
Innovation on the Danube and Loyalty in the Habsburg Empire Mevissen, Robert

Human Control and Autonomy in Cybernetic Systems

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:29
Human Control and Autonomy in Cybernetic Systems Shen, David

Art Is Not Enough! The Artist's Body as Protest

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:28
Art Is Not Enough! The Artist's Body as Protest Calkins, Hannah

Freedom v. The Man: Security, Torture, and "Freedom" in Cory Doctorow's Little Brother

Thu, 01/29/2015 - 15:27
Freedom v. The Man: Security, Torture, and "Freedom" in Cory Doctorow's Little Brother Wells, Thomas

Between Darwin and San Francesco: Zoographic Ambivalances in Mantegazza, Ouida, and Vernon Lee

Tue, 01/27/2015 - 11:37
Between Darwin and San Francesco: Zoographic Ambivalances in Mantegazza, Ouida, and Vernon Lee Pireddu, Nicoletta

Viaggi nell'alterità, musei della mente: Paolo Mantegazza tra reperti e ricordi

Tue, 01/27/2015 - 11:31
Viaggi nell'alterità, musei della mente: Paolo Mantegazza tra reperti e ricordi Pireddu, Nicoletta

Anthropology on Screen: Luigi Pirandello, Virginia Woolf

Tue, 01/27/2015 - 11:17
Anthropology on Screen: Luigi Pirandello, Virginia Woolf Pireddu, Nicoletta

Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 17 Number 1

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:22
Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 17 Number 1

Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 16 Number 1

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:21
Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 16 Number 1

Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 15 Number 1

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:20
Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 15 Number 1

Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 11 Number 2

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:18
Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 11 Number 2

Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 14 Number 1

Fri, 01/23/2015 - 16:16
Georgetown Public Policy Review Volume 14 Number 1

Library Associates Newsletter: Issue 111

Thu, 01/15/2015 - 14:06
Library Associates Newsletter: Issue 111 Lauinger Library John Eliot's Bible; From the University Librarian:What's in a Name, Part 2; The Hoya Online; Party at Club Lau; All Our Names; Music as Cultural Mission; La Belle Creole;Infrequently Asked Questions; Healy Building Permit

All the Ships that Never Sailed: A General Model of Transnational Illicit Market Suppression

Wed, 01/14/2015 - 10:34
All the Ships that Never Sailed: A General Model of Transnational Illicit Market Suppression This model predicts progress in transnational illicit market suppression campaigns by comparing the relative efficiency and support of the suppression regime vis-à-vis the targeted illicit market. Focusing on competitive adaptive processes, this `Boxer' model theorizes that these campaigns proceed cyclically, with the illicit market expressing itself through a clandestine business model, and the suppression regime attempting to identify and disrupt this model. Success in disruption causes the illicit network to `reboot' and repeat the cycle. If the suppression network is quick enough to continually impose these `rebooting' costs on the illicit network, and robust enough to endure long enough to reshape the path dependencies that underwrite the illicit market, it will prevail.; Two scripts put this model into practice. The organizational script uses two variables, efficiency and support, to predict organizational evolution in response to competitive pressures. The suppression network should become `flat' and `market-like,' in order to rapidly adapt, and it should maintain a deeply embedded social movement backing the campaign. Success allows for progress through the operational script, which predicts changes in the illicit market using economic theory. Initially, the illicit market uses public `focal points' to conduct business. If the suppressor succeeds in injecting unacceptable risk in these focal points through patrolling, the illicit market is forced to take a firm-like `black market' form. The suppressor shifts to interdiction in response, and if successful again, they subsidize alternate demand path dependencies. Suppression ends either by the suppressor abandoning the attempt or through a path dependency swap to a benign substitute.; I test these theories using historical cases - the British suppression of the Atlantic Slave Trade and the USCG's `Rum War' during Prohibition. Using a multi-method approach inspired by operations research, I use process tracing, statistical analysis, primary historical research, and social network analysis to evaluate changes in relative efficiency and support over time. I then apply the model to contemporary cases - piracy, human trafficking, money laundering, and drug trafficking - for sensitivity and robustness checks. A large-n analysis provides further scoping. Finally, I apply the model to the policy problem of cyberspace-facilitated modern-day slavery. Ph.D.

A-ephrins in Neuropsychiatric Spectrum Disorder Models

Fri, 01/09/2015 - 09:06
A-ephrins in Neuropsychiatric Spectrum Disorder Models Neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are frequently comorbid and exhibit overlapping abnormalities in both behavioral symptoms and abnormalities in frontal corticostrialal circuits. Thus, it is a particular challenge to identify a "core" molecular pathogenesis that can differentiate between such disorders yet also account for the "spectrum nature" of their phenotypes (clinical presentations) and endophenotypes (underlying neurobiological dysfunction). Given the polygenic and multifactorial etiologies of neuropsychiatric spectrum disorders, there is a need to identify simplifying circuit-level concepts. One strategy proposed for this has been to consider circuit development as a fundamental unit for understanding behavior. This thesis adopted this approach by examining the effects on behavior and anatomy in striatal excitatory microcircuits of gene deletions of A-ephrins, a set of developmental patterning molecules with broad yet complex interactive effects on the development and plasticity of neural macrocircuits and synaptic microcircuits.; First, I tested the hypothesis that specific and combinatorial deletions of ephrin-A ligands are sufficient to generate complex behavioral phenotypes with cross-domain features characteristic of human neuropsychiatric disorders involving dysfunctional frontal-corticostriatal circuitry. Given behavioral evidence in support of this, I next examined dendritic spine morphology in sensorimotor and limbic regions of the striatum seeking evidence that the behavioral phenotype was specifically correlated with changes in frontostriatal circuitry associated with the functional domain of the abnormal behavior. As I did find regional differences in dendritic spine density within the striatum that were correlated with specific learning and memory deficits, I then investigated whether these were accompanied by physiological changes in cell membrane properties or synaptic activity in these striatal regions, and whether the morphological effects detected in adulthood alongside behavioral deficits were present at the much younger developmental age of mice in the electrophysiology experiments. Accordingly, I was able to associate behavioral phenotype with evidence of abnormalities at a circuitry level, but I determined that these effects were not manifest during postnatal development. This raises the possibility that these effects were downstream of general or specific dysfunction along these circuits and may have been experience-dependent. Ph.D.

Degrees of Instructional Explicitness, Depth of Processing, Learning styles and L2 Development: A study on the Spanish Imperfect subjunctive

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 15:32
Degrees of Instructional Explicitness, Depth of Processing, Learning styles and L2 Development: A study on the Spanish Imperfect subjunctive The aim of the present study was three-fold: First, it intended to investigate the effects that different types of instruction varying in explicitness (e.g., Rosa & O'Neill, 1999; Rosa & Leow, 2004), had on 88 intermediate-level Spanish learners' development of the Imperfect subjunctive. Second, it aimed to gain some insight into participants´ minds by employing think-aloud protocols to account for the internal processes that occurred while they carried out a dual task (i.e., reading for meaning and form), and to examine how these processes correlated with post-task performance. Finally, its third goal was to probe deeper into participants' Learning styles (Dornyei, 2005), and, more specifically, into their preference for a deductive or inductive approach to learning grammar rules in the L2. According to their preference, a match or mismatch situation was created with learners matching the treatment received (deductive approach = More explicit condition) or mismatching it (deductive approach = Less explicit conditions) to account for the matched/mismatched design's impact on post-task performance (Valtz, Tare, Jackson, & Doughty, 2013). Participants were semi- randomly assigned to one of six experimental conditions differing in explicitness and in whether they thought aloud or not to control for potential reactivity (Bowles, 2010) (+ Explicit +/- Think aloud (TA), - Explicit +/- TA, Baseline +/- TA). The study consisted of 3 sessions and it followed a pre/post/delayed test design with 2 weeks between each of the sessions. Results showed that the Less explicit condition appeared to perform as well as the More explicit condition immediately after treatment and better 2 weeks after treatment for both interpretation and production tests when compared to the Baseline condition performance. With regards to Depth of Processing, the More explicit condition seemed to elicit more instances of deep processing than the Less explicit or Baseline conditions, and deeper processing significantly correlated with higher comprehension and with a more accurate subsequent production of the target form. With respect to Learning styles, the mismatch condition did positively correlate with better performance at Interpretation immediately after treatment, unlike the matching condition, which failed to yield any positive correlation with post-task performance. Ph.D.

Distress Communication in Cultural Context: Examination of Koreans and Americans

Thu, 01/08/2015 - 15:32
Distress Communication in Cultural Context: Examination of Koreans and Americans Previous research has documented that Asians tend to somatize negative experiences to a greater degree than Westerners. It is posited that somatization may be a more functional communication strategy in Korean than American context. We examined the ways in which Americans and Koreans communicate and respond to distress by analyzing use of and response to somatic words used in narratives. In Study 1, we found that Koreans used more somatic words to communicate distress than Americans. Among Koreans, but not Americans, use of somatic words predicted perceived disclosure quality and expectations of positive reactions (e.g., empathy) from others. In study 2, we found that when presented with distress narratives, Koreans (but not Americans) showed more sympathy in response to narratives using somatic words than narratives using emotional words. These findings suggest that cultural differences in use of somatization may reflect differential effectiveness of somatization in communicating distress across cultural contexts. Ph.D.

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