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The following projects were created on our computers, with our equipment or with the assistance of our staff. Highlighting outstanding multimedia projects inspires other students and faculty to use new media in exciting, innovative ways and helps us demonstrate the value of the productions created using our resources. Please share your work with us by completing our submission form.

Showcase Showdown Fall 2013 winner!

Documentary video on my quest to find mountain biking trails in the Washington DC area. Also documents whether it is possible to have an authentic mountain biking experience in an urban setting like Washington DC.

Do you remember playing with dirt in your childhood? And what do you think about dirt now? As we grow up, we tend to ignore the existence of dirt. For some people, however, dirt plays an important role in their lives. This film observes what dirt creates and brings to them.

MSFS students and administrators spent 11 days traveling through Saudi Arabia during March of 2013. This film follows the experience of three students before, during, and after their visit, as they react to the Saudi education system, government, and culture.

I created this short documentary video regarding gender inequalities for my Global Inequalities final last semester. I produced the video using Gelardin New Media Center equipment.

This documentary video is about students learning Chinese at Georgetown. It is based on the question of "why do you learn Chinese", featuring interviews with students and faculty as well as activities going on inside and outside the class.

This documentary tells the story of the history and current day status of Georgetown ROTC through shadowing one of its top cadets. It also simultaneously documents the legacy of the Vietnam War at Georgetown, and the evolution of perspective between the protests once held on the main lawns against ROTC and the presence of the traveling Vietnam War Memorial this past Fall, The Wall that Heals.

Creating this documentary was one of the most rewarding experiences I've had at Georgetown. It took hours upon hours of hard work through early mornings shooting footage to late nights editing, but was worth every minute for the final product. Learning how to use Final Cut Pro was also an invaluable experience. 

 

The project is an examiniaton of how space is related to sound. It feature three bands talking about their practice space and the limitations that arise.

"I started a personal project called 'Harmless Colors' to create simple colorful sentences on white walls of different public corridors. They are harmless because they are made by removable sticky notes, and I hope these simple sentences like 'and spring comes', 'how are you today', and 'be happy' could bring some colors to strangers' life. Also hope this tiny documentary could create some little good moods for audience."

A 10 minute documentary of the Georgetown men's rugby team that I filmed over the course of the season as my final project for my film minor capstone.

I broke my jaw in October of 2012, thus ending my rugby career. I still wanted to have a place on the team and give others a sense about what it means for those who are part of the organization.

Amir Kamergi found himself in the midst of a revolution. The 23 year old Fulbright scholar, who lived his entire life under the oppressive regime of Tunisia's President, Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, witnessed his country transform overnight. It all started with a single act of desperation - Mohamed Bouazizi, an educated Tunisian man who was forced to be a street vendor to support his family, set himself on fire in protest of the totalitarian government. That day, something awoke in Tunisia. Amir went from being an ordinary student to a passionate political activist. This documentary explores the personal story of the triumphs and tragedies that come with revolution.


Markets are all about interactions. Since the 1930s, Union Market has served its customers faithfully through the changing political, economic, and social climates of D.C. and the United States in general. The rich history of this market is now in jeopardy, as developers work to develop the property to accommodate the district's still-changing landscape. Should this development be halted to preserve the authenticity of this market, or is the redevelopment of the market necessary as a representation of the constant change necessary in Washington D.C. and in America?

On any given day in the District, strangers come together on a metro train with nothing between them but space. While most riders do their best not to make eye contact, a portion of the Red Line offers plenty to observe out the window. Known for its high incidence and history of graffiti, the Red Line metro route has attracted countless writers over the years looking to get up and get their name out. But, what draws them there and what do commuters think of their anonymous works of art?

Using interviews with graffiti writers and red line riders, See Something, Say Something explores the indirect dialogue that graffiti creates. Equal parts craft and confusion, art form and illegal act, red line graffiti embodies all the contradictions of the capital city. As a vital sign of the District's changing pulse, the red line metro is as much a way to understanding D.C. as a way through it.

This short documentary explores how innovations in communications technology have changed how soldiers communicate with family and loved-ones, and how the same innovations create new challenges for the armed forces. The piece was created with a mixture of found footage, images and interviews.

Street Sound from Nadia Mahmassani on Vimeo.

"Does a street musician stand out from the chaos of the street or add to it? Do the unpredictable sights and noises around him compliment his music or obscure it? These are some of the questions that this ten-minute documentary about local musician Perry King attempts to raise. In addition to many other performances around the city, Perry plays nearly every Sunday afternoon in Columbia Heights. He graciously allowed me to film him throughout the spring semester, and my project quickly turned into an exploration of his relationship with his environment, the ever-bustling D.C. streets."

The video explores the controversial role and identity of Mary Magdalene by comparing the opinions of different religious ministers.  Kipp and I interviewed three ministers (two Catholic and one Lutheran) in order to complete our study and understanding of the life of Mary Magdalene for our final project.