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Aerial view of the Reiss Science Building, 2010

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The following projects were created on our computers, with our equipment or with the assistance of our staff. Highlighting outstanding multimedia projects inspires other students and faculty to use new media in exciting, innovative ways and helps us demonstrate the value of the productions created using our resources. Please share your work with us by completing our submission form.

“Capedal” is a documentary exploring Washington, D.C. off the tourist path and onto the cycling path. With 56 miles of bike lanes and 137 Bikeshare stations, Washington, D.C. holds a place among the most bike-friendly cities in the world. From forested trails running alongside the Potomac to busy urban streets in the shadow of the Hill, “Capedal” joins six D.C. cyclists in the areas they love most.

As part of GAAP's continued efforts to attract the best and brightest to Georgetown, our Digital Media Team worked to create a comprehensive video tour of the four freshmen dorms, to provide students unable to attend the GAAP Weekends in person the opportunity to learn more about residential living experience here at Georgetown.

tags: interview, video

On any given day in the District, strangers come together on a metro train with nothing between them but space. While most riders do their best not to make eye contact, a portion of the Red Line offers plenty to observe out the window. Known for its high incidence and history of graffiti, the Red Line metro route has attracted countless writers over the years looking to get up and get their name out. But, what draws them there and what do commuters think of their anonymous works of art?

Using interviews with graffiti writers and red line riders, See Something, Say Something explores the indirect dialogue that graffiti creates. Equal parts craft and confusion, art form and illegal act, red line graffiti embodies all the contradictions of the capital city. As a vital sign of the District's changing pulse, the red line metro is as much a way to understanding D.C. as a way through it.