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John Courtney Murray

John Courtney Murray scholars rejoice! This past week, as part of an ongoing project to collect, digitize, and transcribe The Collected Works of John Courtney Murray, the Woodstock Theological Library has added the ability to keyword search the Murray corpus. 

With the aid of a search toolbar at the top of the page, researchers can now search throughout Murray's works so as to better understand how his thought developed over time, compare different arguments, and track down quotations. Murray's Collected Works are continually being added to by Murray scholars, and there are future plans to offer digital copies of the original works alongside the transcribed copies.

In addition to digitizing Murray's published and unpublished work, Woodstock also holds his papers, which can be searched with a digital finding aid, and requested on site. Combined, these efforts are a part of Woodstock's commitment to aiding Murray scholars with new tools to help them in their research. 

Special thanks to Web Services Coordinator, Stephen Fernie, who helped develop this exciting new tool.

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Guest entry by Peter Herman, doctoral candidate in Georgetown's Department of Theology

James Cone

καὶ ἐξαπέστειλεν Αμασιας ὁ ἱερεὺς Βαιθηλ πρὸςΙεροβοαμ βασιλέα Ισραηλ λέγων συστροφὰς ποιεῖταικατὰ σοῦ Αμως ἐν μέσῳ οἴκου Ισραηλ οὐ μὴ δύνηται ἡγῆ ὑπενεγκεῖν ἅπαντας τοὺς λόγους αὐτοῦ

Then Amaziah, the priest of Bethel, sent to King Jeroboam of Israel, saying, “Amos has conspired against you in the very center of the house of Israel; the land is not able to bear all his words. (Amos 7:10 LXX and NRSV)

Rev. Dr. Raphael Warnock is accustomed to filling large, indeed world-historical, shoes. He is the pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, GA, the pulpit once held by Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Another theological giant had tasked Rev. Dr. Warnock with his eulogy. That giant also stood in the long shadow of King and had preached from the same pulpit as King did when he dared question the legitimacy of American involvement in Vietnam. It was the pulpit Warnock was in today at Riverside Church in Manhattan. So, Rev. Dr. Warnock, who is used to life in these “big shoes” gave the eulogy for another Rev. Dr. He spoke for Rev. Dr. James Hal Cone, whose synthesis of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X utterly reshaped theology over the past 50 years.

Sometimes we stand on the shoulders of giants. Sometimes the giants invite us up there in the first place. Such a giant was James H. Cone. I thought it would be hard to find words by which to remember him, and it is. It is almost worse, however, to carry immediately in my heart the touching memorials by The Very Reverend Kelly Brown Douglas, Dr. Cornell West, and Rev. Dr. Warnock’s moving eulogy. How can I do justice to his memory? This has been the theme of mourning for all of us touched by Cone. It was the theme of all the speakers at his funeral today. How do you remember a man who changed the way your field works? It’s easy to lapse into praise and halos. We all must remember, however, that to pay tribute to Cone, we must continue his work.

Rev. Dr. Warnock reminds us, by quoting Amos, that “the land could not bear” all of James Cone’s words. Some fifty years ago, Cone spent five weeks at his brother Cecil’s AME church writing Black Theology and Black Power. To call that work “disruptive” in a post-Facebook, post-Uber, post-Silicon Valley world is to remind us of just what it can mean to disrupt. In Cone’s case, it means that we start over without the presumption that white, cis-gendered, heterosexual, and male identities can be overlooked as the unnamed norm of theological inquiry. That’s a hard word to hear, and I need to be clear: when Cone identifies Whiteness as demonic and sinful, he does not mean that those born with European features are per se demonic and sinful. What he means is that accepting—or far worse, perpetuating—a system of values that allows white, cis-gendered, heterosexual men to flourish at the expense of others is sinful. White supremacy is demonic. If White people don’t want to be demonic, we need to tear down the system of supremacy from which we’ve benefited for generations.

I’ve caught myself speaking of Cone’s thought in the present tense above, but I’m going to leave it in. I’m going to leave it in as a reminder that every semester, when I tell my college students that people who look like me need to see themselves not as the Apostles in the Gospel but as the Romans, that’s Cone.

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François-René de Chateaubriand
François-René de Chateaubriand

In his most recent book entitled Vatican I: The Council and the Making of the Ultramontane Church,  John W. O’Malley, S.J. examines the intellectual mood of France after the Revolution especially the literary production that happened in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. One important work O’Malley discusses is the Le genie du christianisme, ou Beautés de la religion chrétienne (The Genius of Christianity, or, The Spirit and Beauty of the Christian Religion), which was first published in 1802 and authored by François-René de Chateaubriand and whose picture at the left comes from the 3rd rev. edition. O'Malley describes it as “a brilliant nostalgic, and imaginative rereading of history, ranged over the cultural and civilizing achievements of the past to show how they were either Christian in inspiration or sublimated by Christianity.” (p. 46) He goes on to say that the “book was a huge success and is credited with founding Romanticism in French literature.” (p. 46)

Title Page for The Genius of Christianity

Woodstock Theological Library has a 1829 printing of Genie du christianisme, pictured to the right. As indicated on the title page it was sold by two Parisian booksellers, namely Jean-Jacques Lefèvre (1779-1858) and Pierre-François Ladvocat (1791-1854),  the publisher. On the front paste-down of our second volume is a bookplate (pictured below) for the former owner of this book: Edward J. Sourin, S.J. (1808-1888).

In Woodstock Letters, Vol. 17, No. 3 (1888), there is a brief sketch of Fr. Sourin (pictured below) by an unnamed author. He  was born in Philadelphia, but was orphaned at an early age. As a boy he attended Mount Saint Mary’s College in Emmittsburg, Maryland where he began studying for the priesthood. He was  ordained in 1832. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1855, pronouncing final vows in 1866. In the sketch’s closing, the anonymous author says of Fr. Sourin: “As we linger over the memory of that saintly career, beautiful in its holy simplicity and exalted virtue, we are struck with admiration at what a consummate work that life is which has answered the designs of the Divine Architect.” (p. 353)

Bookplate

Father Sourin

Entry written by Amy Phillips on 5/3/2018

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Adrian Vaagenes

Could you tell us a little about yourself?

I grew up in St. Paul, Minnesota and went to school at St. Olaf College where I majored in history. However, I’ve been "out East," as they say in Minnesota, for the last 9 years, 3 in Princeton, NJ where I got an M.Div from Princeton Theological Seminary, and 6 in Washington D.C. I live in Glover Park with my wife, a minister at Georgetown Presbyterian Church, and two daughters, ages 6 and 7. I love baseball, photography, history, theology, and tacos (my wife and I have a neighborhood taco night at our house every Friday!). I’ve had the opportunity to intern and work with the Smithsonian National Museum of American History, the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage, and most recently with the Local History/Special Collections branch of the Alexandria Library system.

You are a relatively recent MLIS graduate of Valdosta State University. What attracted you to the profession?

A number of things attracted me to working in libraries, and specifically archives. I’m very interested in history, and I’m particularly interested in the "stuff" of history, which is often collected in archives—the pamphlets, photos, letters, newspapers, etc. All that "stuff" makes the time and place of that period come alive for me and that’s exciting to be able to live in every day. It’s like working in a museum, but instead of everything being behind glass, I get to touch it all!

I also enjoy the detective work needed to do good research. For a number of reasons, the majority of information inside an archive isn’t "google-able," which makes every research question an interesting puzzle to solve. Moreover, I also get to help patrons and learn about the material myself. This means I have the opportunity to learn about something new every day.

Finally, I also enjoy being in the academic world and I enjoy being vicariously involved in the broader scholarly conversation. My own work is very practical (e.g. hunting down boxes, organizing collections, digitizing material, etc.), and it’s gratifying to have that work fit into the wider world of scholarship where I can see the fruit of my labor.

You also have a background in theology with an M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary. What area of theology did you specialize in?

Most of my courses were in systematic theology, which attempts to understand theological statements as part of an interconnected whole (e.g. How do statements about God affect statements regarding salvation). While at seminary, I did most of my work on 19th and 20th century Protestant theology, but I was also interested in Roman Catholic theologians who were in dialogue with Reformed and Lutheran theology, like Karl Rahner, Hans Urs von Balthasar, and Hans Kung.

Who is your favorite theologian?>

My favorite theologian is Karl Barth. He was a Swiss Reformed theologian who upended the Protestant theological world with a bombastic commentary on Romans in 1918. He was a brilliant theologian who took biblical criticism and the challenges of modernity seriously while also laying out a vision of the Christian faith (in a 14 volume unfinished dogmatics!) that is ethically and conceptually rigorous. Even when you disagree, he’s always interesting — particularly his biblical exegesis. He was also a courageous figure. He was kicked out of Germany in the 1935 for refusing to swear an oath to Hitler, and helped form the "Confessing Church", which rejected Hitler’s imposition of racial ideology into the church. Barth is also interesting because he was in dialogue with many different disciplines and traditions. His work was so broad that he garnered interest from Marxists, Continental philosophers, and Catholics alike — Pope Pius XII once described Barth as the greatest theologian since Thomas Aquinas!

Who is your favorite heretic?

Well, it all depends on your perspective, but does Martin Luther count? Though I’m a member of a Presbyterian church, I grew up Lutheran, both of my grandfathers were Lutheran pastors, and I lived next to Luther Seminary growing up, so Martin Luther is close to my heart. With the signing of the Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification (JDDJ), Lutheran and Catholic relations are in a much better position than 500 years ago, so "heretic" probably isn’t the right word anymore, but he’s the first one that comes to mind.

Your position title is Digital and Archival Services Librarian. This is an entirely new position for Woodstock Theological Library. Since it is a role you are shaping, what are some goals you have for leading WTL into a direction that integrates its digital and archival collections and services?

My main goal is to broaden the reach of Woodstock Theological Library. Our bibliographic resources and special collections materials are incredible resources for scholars and students of religious studies, theology, and Jesuit history. In order to reach those patrons our collections deserve to be brought into the 21st century. I want to get the word out to students, faculty, and researchers about the incredible collections we have. This means redesigning our web presence (i.e. website, twitter, instagram) to better engage with patrons, as well as digitizing archival collections when possible, or at the very least, making them searchable online. This also means reaching out to faculty to understand how we can better support their teaching efforts through orientations, digital resources, or student project opportunities. This is a big task, but I’m excited to bring our collections up to date, so to speak, so that they can get the attention they deserve.

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Emancipation Day in the District of Columbia is celebrated on April 16th and Georgetown University is hosting a program entitled "Exploring the Legacy of Anne Marie Becraft and the Oblate Sisters.

Plate from The Oblates's Hundred and One YearsAnne Marie Becraft (1805-1833) joined the Oblate Sisters of Providence (OSP) in 1831 after successfully founding and running the first school for black girls in Georgetown. The Oblate Sisters of Providence has great historical import because it is the first religious order for African American women in the US Catholic Church.  It was founded in 1829 by Elizabeth Lange (Mother Mary) and Rev. James Hector Joubert, S.S., pictured at the left. In April of 2017, upon the recommendation of Georgetown's Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation, a building formerly named after William McSherry, S.J., who was involved in the selling of 272 enslaved people in 1838,  was renamed Anne Marie Becraft Hall.

The renaming of the building  underscores the deep commitment to reconciliation that Georgetown University and the Maryland Province of Jesuits bring to the task of confronting their history of owning and selling enslaved people.

Woodstock Theological Library's copy of the Grace H. Sherwood's book entitled The Oblates' Hundred and One Years is signed by the author and was originally presented to Timothy Barrett, S.J., a Woodstock Jesuit.

 

Woodstock's Copy of The Oblates' Hundred and One YearsSignature of Timothy Barrett, S.J.

 

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips, Rare Materials Cataloger for Woodstock Theological Library on 4/12/2018

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Woodstock Theological Library has recently digitized its collection of pamphlets issued by the Catholic Association for International Peace (CAIP). They are now available in DigitalGeorgetown.  The selection of CAIP Pamphlets housed in Woodstock Theological Library cover the years 1928, when the first pamphlet was issued, to 1947.

Catholic Association for International Peace pamphlet

The Catholic Association for International Peace (CAIP) was created in 1927 by the Social Action Department of the National Catholic Welfare Council for the purpose of studying, applying, and promoting Catholic social teachings about war, peace, justice, and human rights. The association was comprised of intellectuals of both the clergy and laity. Of special note is that from the beginning many women religious and lay women played prominent roles in participating in the association’s work. The CAIP published pamphlets in order to reach a broad audience of Catholics so they could be educated about the pressing ideas and activities to promote international peace.      

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips on 11/15/2017

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Woodstock Theological Library is grateful to Fr. John P. Langan, S.J., for his generous gift of a rare book containing the works of Gregory of Nyssa (ca. 329-390 CE), entitled D. Gregorii Nysseni Opvscvla qvinqve: De professione christiana. II. De perfectione, & qualem christianum esse deceat. III. Anagogica vitæ Moysis enarratio; qua, vitæ christianæ quidam is typus fuisse, ostenditur. IV. Contra Apolinarium. V. De fide.

Printer's Mark

D. Gregorii Nysseni Opvscvla qvinqve was printed by the famous Plantin Press in Leiden in 1593, which at this time was under the management   of Franciscus Raphelengius (1539-1597).

It was edited by David Hoeschel (1556-1617), a librarian and scholar from Germany who published many editions of  the works of Gregory of Nyssa, the other Cappadocian Fathers, as well as other Greek patristic authors.

Page from The Life of Moses by Gregory of Nyssa

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips, Rare Materials Cataloger for Woodstock Theological Library on 7/17/2017

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Title Page of The Making of a Jesuit Priest

The Making of a Jesuit Priest was produced by the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus in 1932. It is an important historical document giving a glimpse into the formation of Jesuits in the early 20th century.

Emblem for the Maryland Province of the Society of Jesus

It begins: "The making of a Jesuit priest begins with the moment when the lad of eighteen or nineteen summers, having broken away from his college or high school life, drives up to the portals of the Novitiate, nervous and self-conscious, and is welcomed with both hands by a short, stout, smiling Father called the Master of Novices." Among the many images of houses of formation and study is one of the grounds of the seminary at Woodstock, Maryland, Woodstock Theological Library's namesake.

Woodstock Theological Seminary

At the end of the pamphlet is an appendix of a summary of requirements for applying to become a Jesuit. "Application should be made to: Reverend Father Provincial, 724 North Calvert Street, Baltimore, 2 Maryland." Though no longer the home of the Father Provincial, it is still a Jesuit parish, Saint Ignatius Catholic Church.

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips, Rare Materials Cataloger for Woodstock Theological Library on 7/7/2017

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In the latest issue of Jesuit Higher Education: A Journal, two articles highlight the work being done at Georgetown University to address its founding Jesuit's history of slave ownership.

 Logo for Jesuit Higher Education: A Journal

Thomas Foley, a doctoral candidate in Georgetown's History Department, reviews the Georgetown Slavery Archive and a review of the Report on the Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation is made by Woodstock Theological Library's director, J. Leon Hooper, S.J.

   

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips, Rare Materials Cataloger, Woodstock Theological Library on 6/22/2017
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Peter Phan

Woodstock Theological Library is pleased to participate with the Berkley Center for Religion, Peace & World Affairs in Theology Without Borders: Celebrating the Legacy of Peter Phan, a two day conference gathering together international theologians and scholars of religious studies in order to reflect on and honor the work of Peter C. Phan, the Ignacio Ellacuria Chair of Catholic Social Thought at Georgetown University's Department of Theology. This blog entry, therefore, is meant to shine a light on Peter's scholarship that ranges broad and wide across all areas of theology and religious studies including, but not limited to, eschatology, missiology, liberation, liturgy, and ecclesiology.

Social Thought by Peter Phan

Peter started at the beginning. That is to say, his first scholarly publication was a compilation of Patristic texts which are the foundation to the development of Christian social thought, entitled Social Thought (Wilmington, DE: Michael Glazier, 1984). From this point forward, Peter has produced a body of literature that has impacted and, indeed, shaped the direction of theological studies the world over.

 World Christianity: Perspectives and Insights: Essays in Honor of Peter C. Phan In the festschrift entitled World Christianity: Perspectives and Insights (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books 2016) , theologian Gerard Mannion, notes in his article, “Peter C. Phan: A Person of the World Church,” that Peter is “passionately committed to dialogue – among Christians, among people of differing faiths and religions and between those who follow religious pathways and those who do not do so. Peter’s overall work can collectively be lauded as helping to enhance understanding and dialogue across many differing divides – cultural, ethnic, religious, even political. Peter Phan, then, is a person and servant of the world church. And the test of time will also hopefully demonstrate that, in fact, he has been among its most creative and inspiring theological prophets for our times.” Peter’s most recent editorial collaboration with Bradford E. Hinze resulted in the work Learning from All the Faithfull: A Contemporary Theology of Sensus Fidei. This collection of essays reflect Peter’s “deep influence upon ecclesiology in recent times.” Again, as Gerard Mannion has noted, it is the result of Peter’s own leading scholarship which has brought about the “turn toward a much greater and wide-reaching focus on world Christianity or, better still, as the man himself has said, a turn to the realization that in truth we must today speak about and study world Christianities in the plural.” (Mannion, “Peter C. Phan: A Person of the World Church” in World Christianity: Perspectives and Insights: Essays in Honor of Peter C. Phan.) Woodstock Theological Library is proud that Peter is our patron, colleague, and friend. In fact, he has brought us  much "business" -  so to speak. When searching in our catalog, you will find that almost all of the books he has authored or edited are all checked out!    

 

Entry authored by Amy E. Phillips, Rare Materials Cataloger for Woodstock Theological Library on 3/30/2017.  

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