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Congratulations Graduating Library Student Workers!

Georgetown students at Commencement

Library student workers from the Class of 2018 are graduating this weekend. This exemplary class of student workers across departments has played an integral role in carrying out Library services and providing resources, checking out books to our users at the Circulation Desk, troubleshooting issues with our technology in Library IT, providing guidance on creative projects in the Maker Hub, and so much more. We will miss them at the Library but we will keep a little reminder of them in honor of their wonderful work! Graduating seniors were asked to choose a favorite book to have a custom bookplate in so that their contributions to the Library and the Hilltop could be commemorated in the Library stacks. Here are some of the books that the class of 2018 chose!

Cameron Perales

Cameron Perales, Classics

What is your job at the Library?
I have had a few jobs at the Library over the past four years. I started working at Blommer Science Library as a Freshman doing both work at the desk and shelving in the stacks. I then moved to Lauinger where I mostly worked in the stacks but I moved back to the desk by my Junior year. This year I went back to Blommer for much of the year which was a nice bookend to my time here.

What book did you choose and why did you choose that book?
I chose Divine images and human imaginations in Ancient Greece and Rome, edited by Joannis Mylonopoulos. I am a classics major and that was a book that stuck out to me as a very interesting and unique topic that parallels my studies a lot of ways. I am a religious person and enjoy studying religion, so I find reading about how Ancient Greeks and Romans incorporated religion into their culture and art very interesting.

What will you miss most about Georgetown?
I will miss the people and the community here at Georgetown the most. People here are very passionate about what they want to do and what they’re interested in which makes them willing to ask the bigger questions and have in-depth discussions. Those discussions have helped me develop into who I am now and think about things beyond myself, and for that reason amongst others I will miss that community.

What advice would you pass down to future Hoyas?
In two of my clubs we have had the opportunity to give advice to younger Hoyas, so I’ve thought about this a bit. My three pieces of advice are:

  1. Make time for the people you get to interact with, build your community.
  2. Go for the things that are interesting to you, don’t hold yourself back from trying things. Get over the fear of failure because if you think that it will be worth it, it will be worth it.
  3. One of the best things you can attempt to do in college is to use the time to figure out who you are. To do that you have to use the people, the resources and the place to figure out what really matters to you and why.

Max Schreiner

Max Schreiner, Political Economy and Philosophy

What is your job at the Library?
I work in the Technical Services Department and my job consists of processing items for the Library collection and completing special projects which can consist of fixing books that haven’t been labeled properly to applying bookplates. I may even apply my own bookplate!

What book did you choose and why did you choose that book?
I chose The Metaphysics of Capitalism by Andrea Miocci. I am a Political Economy major and a Philosophy minor and one of my favorite courses was Metaphysics which was taught by Professor Linda Wetzel. Metaphysics is a really unique area of study because it is about the science of things that we haven’t fully grasped yet. This book is similar to that because it looks at the social norms that have gone into establishing capitalism. As a Political Economy major, I believe in core capitalist principles but this book challenges you to look at what in society has led us to this point. What if there is something out there that is better that we haven’t considered yet?

What will you miss most about Georgetown?
I will really miss seeing the hustle and bustle of Georgetown. I have lived on the north side of campus my entire time at Georgetown and every day I walk past Healy Hall, the farmers market, and more to get to class or shifts at Lau. I will miss the energy of Georgetown.

What advice would you pass down to future Hoyas?
Use this opportunity to connect with all the faculty that you can because everyone has really specific interests, stories to tell, and things to teach you. Also, attend as many events as you can, you’ll never have opportunities to go to events like this again and you don’t want to regret missing out!