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Adam Rothman

Adam Rothman profile picture
"AMST 272 students benefited from podcast training and individual assistance from Nikoo Yahyazadeh, and they used software installed on computers in the Picchi Multimedia Room to edit their podcasts."

Adam Rothman is a professor in the History Department. Professor Rothman is an expert in the history of the United States from the Revolution to the Civil War, and in the history of slavery and abolition in the Atlantic world. He was a member of Georgetown's Working Group on Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation, and is the principal curator of the Georgetown Slavery Archive.

For Facing Georgetown's History (AMST-272), students were tasked with producing a 10-15 minute podcast for their final project that was inspired by Georgetown's Slavery, Memory, and Reconciliation initiative.

Projects

Old photo of Healy hall at Georgetown University
Georgetown's history with the institution of slavery is told through the lens of family members who sued for their freedom at the turn of the 19th century.
Georgetown University circa 1850
Georgetown students address the impact of slavery on the legacy of education inequality and college preparedness in black communities.
Raymond "Pebbles" Medley
This podcast tells the story of a forgotten Georgetown icon in relation to the slave sale of the GU272 in 1838.
Rev. Matthew Carnes, S.J.
The Society of Jesus Apologizes, 179 Years Later.