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Marc Howard

Marc Howard profile picture
"The production of my students' documentary projects would not have been impossible without the incredible material, logistical, and technical support of the Gelardin New Media Center and its very helpful staff."

 

Marc Morjé Howard is Professor of Government and Law at Georgetown University, and he is the author of Unusually Cruel: Prisons, Punishment, and the Real American Exceptionalism, which will be published by Oxford University Press in July 2017. He is the founding Director of the Prisons and Justice Initiative, which brings together scholars, practitioners, and students to examine the problem of mass incarceration from multiple perspectives. He also teaches regularly in the Prison Scholars Program at the Jessup Correctional Institution, a maximum-security prison in Maryland. His work addresses the deep challenges of contemporary democracy and the tragedy of criminal justice and prisons in America.

In Georgetown’s “Prison Reform Project” GOVX-400 course, 18 students were led by Professor Marc Howard in a groundbreaking project to highlight the stories of 6 returning citizens. Over the course of 4 months, students worked in groups to produce short documentaries profiling each individual’s struggles and triumphs. The ultimate goal of the project is to raise awareness of the challenges of societal reintegration, and the implications for individuals, families, and communities, as well as to inspire others to involve themselves in efforts to end mass incarceration.

Formerly incarcerated Americans reentering society aren't statistics, they're humans.  Here are some of their stories.

Projects

Monte Pollard, director of community outreach at the D.C. Mayor’s Office for Returning Citizen Affairs
Monte Pollard shares his story of growing up in southeast DC, his time in prison and readjusting to society.
Brett Oye: Photographs from childhood
Brett Oye shares his experiences as a returning citizen after being incarcerated.
black and white image of a man looking out a window
Evans Ray receives clemency from President Obama after receiving a life sentence for a non-violent drug offense.
Ronald Thomas-Bey
Sentenced to life imprisonment plus 115 years, Ronald Thomas-Bey fought his case and won his freedom.
Subjects and filmmakers of "Man Behind Bars"
This documentary tells the story of a man wrongfully convicted of murder in 1991.
Bring Brookins Home
This film sheds light on one man's story of a wrongful conviction and the immense challenges facing innocent inmates seeking exoneration.
Thumbnail image of the "Story of Keith Washington"
This short documentary exposes the truly bizarre wrongful conviction of an African American military veteran and former police officer who received an unprecedented 45-year prison sentence for involuntary manslaughter.
Thumbnail of The Story of Jermane Scott video
This short documentary tells the story of wrongfully convicted Jermane Scott and argues for his exoneration.
Thumbnail of Guilty Until Proven Innocent
A short documentary that exposes the injustice that resulted in the wrongful conviction of Terrel Barros, who was sentenced to two consecutive life terms plus 30 years.
Thumbnail image of Walk Tall
This short documentary exposes the layers of injustice culminating in the wrongful conviction of Edward Martinez.
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