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James Ord and His Family: Beyond 200 Years in America

Howard W. Gunlocke Rare Book and Special Collections Room
October 31, 2006
December 31, 2006

 

Introduction:

This exhibit highlights the contributions to American history made by the family of James Ord, who entered Georgetown College as a student in 1800. Many Ord family members have attended Georgetown University in the more than 200 years since James Ord studied here. While touching on the lives of various Ords, the materials in this exhibit particularly feature the experiences of James Ord, who was reputed to be the son of Mrs. Fitzherbert, the wife of King George IV of England; E.O.C. Ord I, best known as a Union officer in the American Civil War; and E.O.C. Ord II, a longtime soldier and a veteran of the Spanish-American War. In addition, documents relating to other family members are included in this display. The Ord family has a long and distinguished history, and its intersection with Georgetown University provides an interesting vantage point from which to view American history. Thanks to the generosity of Ords and other individuals, especially Marian Ord and Edward W. Hutchinson and Judith L. Hutchinson, who donated portions of the Ord Family Papers to our institution, Georgetown University has a fine collection documenting the family’s fascinating history.

Items in the Exhibition:

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Autograph Letter Signed dated 12/20/1816 from the Duke of Kent to Mrs. Fitzherbert, noting that it had been four months since he left England and recounting his extensive travels on the European continent. Sent from Brussels. Edward Augustus (1767-1820), the Duke of Kent and Strathern, the brother of King George IV, was the fourth son of King George III and the father of Queen Victoria.

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Autograph Letter Signed dated 8/23/1831 from Minney Seymour, the “adopted” daughter of Mrs. Fitzherbert, to her mother Mrs. Fitzherbert, reporting recent social events and inquiring about her mother’s rheumatism. Addressed to “My dearest Mama.” Several original letters to Mrs. Fitzherbert are tipped-in to this copy of the book Sir Shane Leslie authored, Mrs. Fitzherbert: A Life Chiefly from Unpublished Sources (London: Burns Oates, 1939). This was his own copy. Minney Seymour was the mother of Constance Dawson-Damer, who married Sir John Leslie. Lady Leslie was, in turn, the mother of noted Catholic author Sir Shane Leslie. Thus, the grandmother of Sir Shane Leslie was believed to have been a daughter of Mrs. Fitzherbert and supposedly a sister of James Ord.

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Painting (reproduction) of Mrs. Fitzherbert by Thomas Gainsborough. California Palace of the Legion of Honor, Lincoln Park, San Francisco.

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Sir Shane Leslie. Mrs. Fitzherbert: A Life Chiefly from unpublished sources (New York: Benzinger, 1939).

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Sir Shane Leslie. The Letters of Mrs. Fitzherbert and Connected
Papers: Being the Second Volume of the Life of Mrs. Fitzherbert (London: Burns Oates, 1940). There are manuscripts inserted into this copy, which was Sir Shane Leslie’s copy.

Mrs. Fitzherbert

Anita Leslie. Mrs. Fitzherbert (New York: Scribner, 1960).

James Ord

James Ord (1786-1873) entered Georgetown College as a student in 1800. He was reputed to be the son of Mrs. Fitzherbert, the wife of King George IV of England. After emigrating to America, Ord worked first near Norfolk, Virginia as a ship builder, next in Charles County, Maryland in ship construction, and then on a farm outside of Washington, D.C. He joined the Society of Jesus in 1806 but left the order in 1811. Soon thereafter, Ord joined the Navy, but he served in the infantry during the War of 1812. Ord lived in Allegheny County, Maryland from 1815 to 1819, in Washington, D.C. from 1819 to 1837, in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan in the mid-1800s, and in California after 1855. James Ord died in 1873.

Georgetown College Tuition Ledger Entry (Reproduction) for James Ord, dated 1800. This portion of the ledger lists Ord’s expenses in the year 1800.

James Ord

Photograph of a Painting of James Ord. The painting was done circa 1840 by Frank B. Mayer after William Garl Brown. Oil on canvas. The frame dimension is 36.5” x 32”. The painting was donated to Georgetown University by Ord’s son Pacificus Ord. The painting hangs in the Philodemic Room in Healy Hall of Georgetown University, and it is cared for as part of the Georgetown University Art Collection.

James Ord to James Placidus Ord (son of James Ord & Rebecca Ruth Cresap Ord)

Autograph Letter Signed dated 10/27/1843 from James Ord to his son J. Placidus, addressed from Sault St. Marie, Mich., to Wisconsin. The letter discusses family news and encourages Placy in his endeavors. It includes references to life at the Sault: "It is thought that the Sault next year will be quite a stirring place as the mines are attracting strangers from all quarters." The letter also describes life on the family farm there: the livestock and produce.

James Ord to James Lycurgus Ord (son of James Ord & Rebecca Ruth Cresap Ord)

Autograph Letter Signed dated 11/22/1847 from James Ord to his son James Lycurgus Ord, surgeon with the U.S. Army 3rd Artillery, regarding family news, Sault Sainte Marie social life and economic life, and advice on what to do should he meet a grizzly bear. Sent from Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan to Monterey, California.

James Ord to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 3/2/1850 from James Ord to his son James Lycurgus Ord, regarding James Lycurgus Ord's candidacy for member of Congress, the possibility of California joining the Union, and family news. Sent from Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan to Monterey, California.

James Ord to James Placidus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed (minus fragment torn from p.3) dated from Washington, D.C. 6/7/1850. The letter gives news that John Stephen is attending Georgetown College and Georgiana is attending the academy of the Convent of the Visitation (present-day: Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School, Washington, D.C.)

James Ord to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 2/2/1852 from James Ord to his son James Lycurgus Ord, regarding a ranch in Sacramento, family news, reference to E.O.C. Ord I, James' land bounty for War of 1812 services, Edward's land bounty for Mexican War services, and James' plans to move to California. Sent from Washington, D.C. to Monterey, California.

James Ord

Autograph Manuscript: "Early Recollections of James Ord, late Lieut., War of 1812." Written in pencil by Georgiana Catherine Ord Holladay (his daughter) "from his lips" on 2/16/1866 in San Francisco. Later overwritten to preserve in ink by E.O.C. Ord II in 1891.

James Ord

Undated photograph of James Ord taken by W. Kurtz, photographer.

E.O.C. Ord I to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 2/4/1873 from E.O.C. Ord I to his brother James Lycurgus Ord, reporting the death of their father James Ord. Sent from Headquarters, Department of the Platte, Omaha, Nebraska.

Mary Ord Preston

Memoranda Concerning James Ord, who died January 25th, 1873, by his granddaughter, Mary Ord Preston (Washington, D.C., 1896)

E.O.C. Ord I to James Placidus Ord

E.O.C. Ord I (Edward Otho Cresap Ord) (1818-1883) was born near Cumberland, Maryland on October 18, 1818, the son of James Ord and Rebecca Ruth (Cresap) Ord. After receiving a West Point appointment from the District of Columbia, Ord graduated from the military academy in 1839. Prior to the American Civil War, he served in the Mexican War in California and the American Indian Wars. On October 14, 1854, he married Mary Mercer Thompson. Ord saw extensive action as a Union officer in the Civil War, most significantly as commander in one of the North’s earliest victories at Dranesville, Virginia; as a prominent participant in the siege of Vicksburg; and as a major force in the final drive against Petersburg and Richmond that culminated in Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox Court House. After the war, Ord commanded the departments of Arkansas, California, Texas, and the Platte. In 1881, he retired from the army. E.O.C. Ord I died in Cuba in 1883. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

Autograph Letter Signed dated 10/7/1837 to James Placidus Ord from his brother E.O.C. Ord I. Written at West Point, New York, to J. Placidus in Sault St. Marie, Michigan. The letter primarily concerns Edward's request for "very desirable blankets, Buffalo moccasins, etc.," and a visit to Niagara Falls, "...you would have a better idea of it if you could imagine the bed of the Potomac to sink suddenly 200 feet..."

E.O.C. Ord I to James Placidus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 2/27/1845 to James Placidus Ord in Sault St. Marie, Michigan, from his brother E.O.C. Ord I, writing from Fort McHenry, Maryland. The letter concerns employment prospects for their brother Robert Brent Ord. Edward mentions having recommended Robert to John Charles Fremont (1813-1890), the explorer and army officer, who was about to start an expedition to California; however, "Fremont told [him] that his party about 30 strong was made up of trappers, hunters and mountaineers, men who could find as well as defend themselves as they traveled, that no escort of troops was wanted..."

E.O.C. Ord I to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed from E.O.C. Ord I to his brother James Lycurgus Ord, providing a vivid glimpse of life in California prior to the gold rush. The letter includes references to leaving on the ship "Natalie" to raise recruits at Salt Lake [City], army officer and acting governor of California (1847-1849) Richard B. Mason, army activities in northern Mexico, description of Santa Cruz [California], and Ord's regiment during the Mexican War. Sent from Monterey, California to Santa Barbara, California. Dated 2/23/1848. During the Mexican War, which ended 2/1848, E.O.C. Ord I served garrison duty in Monterey, California.

E.O.C. Ord I to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed (with envelope) dated 6/14/1848 from E.O.C. Ord I to his brother James Lycurgus Ord, regarding a proposed treaty between the U.S. and Mexico. The letter mentions American military officer Winfield Scott being tired of the court of inquiry. In other matters, the letter makes reference to the 1848 Revolution in France, French King Louis Philippe, U.S. army officer Gideon J. Pillow, and U.S. military figure Henry Wager Halleck. The letter also mentions that William T. Sherman, U.S. army officer and friend of E.O.C. Ord I, is leaving for the gold region. Sent to Santa Barbara, California.

E.O.C. Ord I to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 6/29/1848 from E.O.C. Ord I to his brother James Lycurgus Ord, describing the California gold rush. The letter includes references to U.S. army officer William T. Sherman. Ord states that many are leaving Monterey, California to prospect for gold and mentions that farmers near Sutter's Mill, the famous site associated with the California gold rush, are reaping rewards. The letter again refers to U.S. army officer Henry Wager Halleck. Sent from Monterey, California to Santa Barbara, California.

E.O.C. Ord I to James Lycurgus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 8/23/1848 from E.O.C. Ord I to his brother James Lycurgus Ord, vividly describing a recent visit to the heart of the California gold rush. Ord refers to Sutter's Mill and U.S. army officer William T. Sherman. Sent from Monterey, California to Santa Barbara, California.

E.O.C. Ord I

Undated Autograph Manuscript (in French) labeled in pencil as "Memoir of Genl [Edward Otho Cresap] Ord [1818-1883] in French." The document is a biographical sketch of Ord, not a memoir.

E.O.C. Ord I to James Placidus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 4/19/1846 to James Placidus Ord in the Michigan legislature from his brother E.O.C. Ord I writing from Philadelphia. The letter concerns the college prospects of their younger brothers William Marcellus (also known as "Marcy") and "Jack" (possibly, John Stephen). Commenting on Georgetown College, Edward writes, "I think that Georgetown College is one of the most expensive institutions in the United States, tis too far south, and the schooling is in my opinion too much on the Classic style for our utilitarian and go ahead Americans. A boy at Georgetown is bound for 3 or 4 years to Latin, Greek, etc., which, unless he is destined for Law, Medicine or Divinity is about as useful to him as so much Sanscrit. To teach a young man to be an engineer, surveyor, draughtsman, tolerable mathematician, chemist or good English scholar and composer is of far more use than all the obsolete ideas that dead men have ever expressed in languages which ought to have been buried with them.”

Bernarr Cresap, Appomattox Commander: The Story of General E.O.C. Ord (S. Brunswick, NJ: A.S. Barnes, 1981)
James Lycurgus Ord to E.O.C. Ord I

Autograph Letter Signed dated 9/25/1865 from James Lycurgus Ord to his brother E.O.C. Ord I, acknowledging receipt of a newspaper article about E.O.C. Ord I’s tour in Lake Superior Country. The letter discusses James Lycurgus' living in various parts of the United States and refers to James Lycurgus spending time in his youth at the "old agency house" in Sault Sainte Marie. Ord says that he has not seen American military leader Henry Wager Halleck in California. He also speculates on E.O.C. Ord I's chances of getting a Major Generalship and of Ord's successes during the Civil War, with reference to heading off Confederate general Robert E. Lee when Union general Philip H. Sheridan's lines had been driven in. Sent from Santa Barbara, California to Detroit, Michigan.

E.O.C. Ord I

Portrait Photograph of Edward Otho Cresap Ord I in military uniform, circa 1861-1865.

Cecil Clay to E.O.C. Ord I

Autograph Letter Signed dated 1/28/1880 from American Civil War veteran Cecil Clay to E.O.C. Ord I, praising the 58th Pennsylvania regiment and inviting Ord to write Civil War recollections. Sent from Washington, D.C.

William T. Sherman & S. B. Maxey

Typed Transcript of letter dated 12/20/1880 from Senator S. B. Maxey, of the Senate Military Committee, to General William T. Sherman, Commanding U.S. Army, regarding Senate bill 1922 for the relief of Brigadier General & Brevet Major-General E.O.C. Ord I; sent from U.S. Senate Chamber, Washington, D.C. Also, Typed Transcript of letter in reply from Sherman to Maxey dated 12/21/1880, praising Ord at length; sent from Fifth Avenue Hotel, Madison Square, N.Y. A handwritten note [presumably dated 1936] by Eleanor Sherman Fitch relates that the letters were copied from newspaper articles in a scrap book.

Vicksburg National Military Park

Typed Letter Signed dated 8/15/1941 from James R. McConaghie, Superintendent of Vicksburg National Military Park, to Ellen Frances Ord, of the American Association of University Women, transcribing the inscription of a statue of E.O.C. Ord I in Vicksburg National Military Park and offering to assist her with a biography on General Ord.

E.O.C. Ord I

Undated photograph of E.O.C. Ord I taken by Mathew Brady’s National Photographic Portrait Galleries, No. 352 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C.

E.O.C. Ord I

Photograph: "Capt., later Major General Edward Otho Cresap Ord, standing, Georgiana Catherine Ord, and Dr. James Lycurgus Ord. brothers & sister. Taken, probably in Washington, D.C. 1851."

E.O.C. Ord I

Photograph: "Capt., later Major General Edward Otho Cresap Ord, standing, Georgiana Catherine Ord, and Dr. James Lycurgus Ord. brothers & sister. Taken, probably in Washington, D.C. 1851."

E.O.C. Ord I

Photograph (xerox copy): "Maj. General E.O.C. Ord, U.S.A. standing by the marble table upon which General Grant and General Lee signed The Surrender at Appomattox, Va. April 10, 1865." The photo was taken at the Jefferson Davis Mansion, Richmond, Virginia.

E.O.C. Ord I

Undated Photograph of statue of E.O.C. Ord I.

E.O.C. Ord II

E.O.C. Ord II (Edward Otho Cresap Ord II) (1858-1923), the son of E.O.C. Ord I and Mary Mercer (Thompson) Ord, was born on November 9, 1858, at Benicia Barracks, California. After attending public schools in San Francisco and Omaha, he was appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy in 1876, only to withdraw a year later. In 1879, however, Ord became a second lieutenant in the 22nd infantry. He soon saw action in the American Indian campaign in Texas and the campaign against Sitting Bull. His 22nd infantry was among the first American troops to enter Cuba in the Spanish-American war in 1898, and his unit experienced heavy fighting. Following duty suppressing a rebellion in the Philippines, Ord retired from the army on account of disabilities sustained in Cuba. Ord continued his military pursuits, however, as he worked as a military aid to the Arizona governor and served on the Mexican border. In 1918, he retired to California. E.O.C. Ord II died on April 4, 1923 at Eagle Rock, California.

Undated photograph of E.O.C. Ord II, in navy cadet uniform. He was the son of general E.O.C. Ord I. Notes on the back indicate that the photograph was taken at the U.S. Naval Academy [Annapolis].

E.O.C. Ord II

Typed Manuscript: "Memorandum of Military Service of Captain E. O. C. Ord [II] U. S. A." This document provides detailed biographical information about Ord's career in the army.

E.O.C. Ord II

Partly Printed Document dated 9/23/1879 appointing E.O.C. Ord II Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. U.S. Secretary of War George W. McCrary notified Ord of his promotion.

E.O.C. Ord II

Drawing dated 1883 for an invention by E.O.C. Ord II: a distance measuring pencil holder. E.O.C. Ord II was an inventor, and his papers include information about some of his inventions.

Diary in Possession of E.O.C. Ord II

Autograph Manuscript Diary. Dated 1890-1891. "From Camp on Tongue R[iver] Mt[Montana]. to Powder River and Return." The diary reads, in part, “Saturday Dec. 20, 1890. Camp at Harkins Ranche on South Fork of Cannon Bull. At 6 p.m. while at HT ranche a courier arrived announcing plans of Gen. Ruger for capture of Sitting Bulls[‘] band. We returned immediately to Harmans ranche where we found that one of our wheel mules had died from fatigue the day before. On the morning of the next day, yesterday, 19th we returned across country 30 mi[les] to New England City….” Sitting Bull, a legendary Native American leader, was seized on December 15 on the Grand River in South Dakota and killed that same day as his warriors attempted to save him.

E.O.C. Ord II

Photograph dated 1883 of E.O.C. Ord II, in military attire standing beside a chair, taken by D. P. Barr, San Antonio, Texas.

E.O.C. Ord II

Photographs dated 1897-1898 from E.O.C. Ord's scrapbook from Fort Crook, Nebraska, 22nd Infantry. Scenes of interest: Post Hospital (16 miles south of Omaha), First Aid instruction; and Fort Crook before Spanish-American War.

E.O.C. Ord II’s Spanish-American War diary

Autograph Manuscript Diary: "Cuban War Diary of E.O.C. Ord II.” The entry for Tuesday, June 21, 1898 reads, “We did not land. Moved out at sea. And in the morning slowly approached the mouth of the harbor arriving within eight miles. Lay there all day. At about 5 p.m. we received news of a battle between marines and Spaniards at Guantanamo…. The marines now hold the town of Guantanamo.”

E.O.C. Ord II

Autograph Document Signed dated 3/7/1899 written by Theodore Mosher, Major, U.S. Army, Retired. The document reveals that E.O.C. Ord II of the 22nd U.S. Infantry was knocked unconscious during battle in El Caney, Cuba on 7/1/1898 during the Spanish-American War, resulting in the loss of his field glass and case issued by the Signal Service. Ord insisted that he should not be held accountable for the loss of equipment as it occurred by accident.

E.O.C. Ord II - Patents

Printed materials and manuscript materials circa 1890s regarding patents for gold pans.

Gold Extraction

Autograph Manuscript (in shorthand) by E.O.C. Ord II: "Process: Gold Extraction." Several other documents among E.O.C. Ord II’s papers are in shorthand.

E.O.C. Ord II

Drawing by E.O.C. Ord II dated 6/12/1902 entitled "approaching Honolulu - the Island.” E.O.C. Ord II’s travels led him to the Philippines, Cuba, and all across the American landscape.

E.O.C. Ord II

Autograph Manuscript Diary by E.O.C. Ord II, Captain, U.S. Army. Dated 1902-1903. Mostly in English, some notes in shorthand. The diary details Ord’s travels to the Philippines. The 3/25/1903 entry from Zamboanga in the Philippines reads, in part, “Tomorrow I shall have the pleasure of going to Mass.” On 3/26/1903, he reports, “A coat ship from Australia passed through this port at about 2 p.m. and at 3:30 p.m. the Annapolis - ‘Capt Hughes’ came in port from ‘Jollo.’ Now we have two war cruisers in port.”

Arizona

Correspondence dated 1911 to E.O.C. Ord II from government land agent M. E. Leverich & Company of Phoenix, Arizona, regarding land in which Ord had an interest.

Geronimo Trevino

Autograph Letter dated 2/23/1912 from E.O.C. Ord II to Geronimo Trevino, offering to assemble a regiment in the U.S. to aid General Trevino in his rebellion to restore the republic in Mexico. Ord asks for land and monetary compensation for those who fight in the regiment. Sent from Los Angeles, California. Mexican military figure Geronimo Trevino married into the Ord family in 1880.

E.O.C. Ord II

Typed Manuscript: "A copy of statement made by E.O.C. Ord. The Ord Ranch. Description of the land." Found among papers of E.O.C. Ord II. The document provides a good description of the Ord Ranch in California.

Bowling - James Lycurgus Ord to Placidus Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 2/5/1843 from James Lycurgus Ord to his brother Placidus Ord, regarding family members, James Lycurgus' medical studies, and Sault Sainte Maire social life. The letter refers to playing "ten pins" at the "ball ally." Sent from Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan to Racine, Wisconsin.

Cresap Society Bulletin

Periodical: "Cresap Society Bulletin: A National Organization of the Descendants of Colonel Thomas Cresap, the Western Maryland Pathfinder, Pioneer, Patriot." On display: Bulletin No. 8 (May 1936) featuring a biographical sketch of E.O.C. Ord I and Bulletin No. 10 (July 1936) providing a list of members, including Miss Ellen Frances Ord, daughter of E.O.C. Ord II and Mary Francis Norton Ord.

Ellen Frances Ord

Photograph of Ellen Frances Ord dated 1911.

Ellen Frances Ord

Ticket Book belonging to Ellen Frances Ord: "Adult's Fifty Admission Book: February Eighteenth, December Second, 1939. Golden Gate International Exposition, San Francisco Bay, 1939."

Ellen Frances Ord

Ticket Book belonging to Ellen Frances Ord: "Adult's Fifty Admission Book: February Eighteenth, December Second, 1939. Golden Gate International Exposition, San Francisco Bay, 1939."

Ellen Frances Ord

Photograph from California School for the Blind, where Ellen Frances Ord worked. Also, Typed Letter Signed dated 3/14/1944 from Bertram A. Betts to Ellen Frances Ord, regarding an article she prepared on Red Cross activities at the school.

Georgiana Ord

Autograph Letter Signed dated 7/14/1853 from James Ord to his daughter Georgiana Catherine Ord, regarding travel plans and family news; sent from Stone House, near Grantsville to Cumberland, Maryland.

Julius P. Garesche

Autograph Letter Signed dated 1/21/1880 from Union General William Rosecrans to Major A.J. Dallas, praising the military prowess and religious devotion of Julius P. Garesche. The letter recounts Colonel Garesche’s unfortunate death in the battle of Murfreesboro during the Civil War. Garesche served as Rosecrans’ chief of staff, and Rosecrans knew E.O.C. Ord I. The Ord family named several sons Garesche, including Jules Garesche Ord (son of E.O.C. Ord I), who died in the Spanish American War, and James Garesche Ord (son of E.O.C. Ord II), who saw duty in World War I.

Julius P. Garesche

Autograph Transcript of a Telegram from General Rosecrans to the War Department, regarding the death of Colonel Julius P. Garesche.

James Garesche Ord

Photograph circa 1919 of J.A. Perry and James Garesche Ord, the son of E.O.C. Ord II and Mary Frances Norton Ord. James Garesche Ord was a World War I aide de camp of U.S. general Hunter Liggett, who commanded the Army of Occupation in Germany from 1918 to 1919.

James Garesche Ord

Photograph of American World War I military hero John J. Pershing walking down a sidewalk with General Moseley and Major Ord. Circa 1919.

James Garesche Ord

Photograph of French commander Ferdinand Foch, British commander Sir Douglas Haig, and American general Hunter Liggett about to enter a vehicle, circa 1918-1919.

Mary Mercer Thompson Ord (wife of E.O.C. Ord I)

Photograph of Mary Mercer Thompson Ord, who married E.O.C. Ord I in 1854.

Pacificus Ord to E.O.C. Ord I

Autograph Letter Signed dated 9/19/1839 from "P. Ord," most likely Pacificus, the son of James Ord and Rebecca Ruth Cresap Ord, as he refers to James Placidus and to sending money to Mrs. Pogue, his mother-in-law who had gone with the two children of Pacificus to live in New York some time in 1856.

Mary Ord Preston

Autograph Letter Signed dated 6/18/1904 from Mary Ord Preston to W.B. Chilton, regarding the possibility that James Ord was the son of George IV and Mrs. Fitzherbert. Mary Ord Preston was the daughter of Pacificus Ord and Maria Louisa Pogue Ord.

Mary Ord Preston

Autograph Letter Signed dated 2/21/1906 from Mary Ord Preston to W.B. Chilton, regarding the question of James Ord’s parentage. In the letter, Preston suggests that Mrs. Fitzherbert did not seek to regain her son James Ord because she thought he had entered the Society of Jesus and did not want to distract him from his priestly duties. Preston also wonders whether Archbishop John Carroll, a friend of Mrs. Fitzherbert’s family, knew of James Ord’s true parentage. The letter also notes that William Brent, a member of the famous Brent family, was the executor of James Ord’s reputed Uncle’s will.

Mary Ord Preston

Photograph dated 1877 of Mary Ord Preston, daughter of Pacificus Ord.

Rebecca Ruth Cresap Ord

Photograph: "Rebecca Ruth [Cresap] Ord, wife of James Ord."