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Scholarly Communication

Our Scholarly Communication Symposium series is designed to allow an open forum for a wider discussion of how research and scholarship are changing and for continuing University dialogue surrounding initiatives in scholarly communication.

Links to videos of our previous events are below.

 

Get It Right: Negotiating the Publishing Contract and Rights to Your Scholarship

Friday, April 24, 2015

With speakers:

Jan Constantine, General Counsel, The Authors Guild
Kyle Courtney, Copyright Advisor and Program Manager, Office for Scholarly Communication, Harvard University
Laura Leichum, Digital Publishing and Rights Manager, Georgetown University Press
and moderator Yianna Vovides, Director of Learning Design and Research, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS)

Are you ready to publish a book or journal article? One of the first steps in the publication process is to sign a publication agreement with your publisher. This agreement will define what rights you are transferring to the publisher and what rights, if any, you are retaining.

Before you sign, read the agreement, understand what it says, and negotiate to retain rights to your work!

In this workshop, our panel of experts will provide you with practical advice on how to take an active approach to managing copyright in your works. There are many questions to ask as you review the publication agreement, including:

  • What rights, if any, do I have to use the work in future academic or professional endeavors?
  • Can I upload an article or book chapter to my personal website or an institutional repository?
  • Am I restricted in any way on publishing future editions of my work or new works on the topic?
  • What can the publisher do with my work in the future?

Our panelists will address these issues and more. You will leave the workshop with the background and knowledge you need to negotiate effectively with publishers and to preserve the rights you need as an author, educator, and scholar.

Ample time will be provided for questions and answers with the panelists.

RSVP here.

Accommodation requests related to a disability should be made by Friday, April 17 to Grace McKinney at gsm37@georgetown.edu. A good faith effort will be made to fulfill all requests.

Members of the Scholarly Communication Committee include Richard Brown, Director, Georgetown University Press; Meg Oakley, Interim Director, Copyright & Scholarly Communications, Lauinger Library; William Olsen, Social Sciences Bibliographer, Lauinger Library; Carole Sargent, Director, Office of Scholarly Publications; Morgan Stoddard, Research Services Librarian, Georgetown University Law Library; and Yianna Vovides, Director of Learning Design and Research, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS).

Academic Presses and Scholarly Publishing

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

With speaker:

Kate Marshall, Acquisitions Editor, University of California Press

In this talk, Ms. Marshall shared her experience and insights gained as an acquisitions editor and provided practical advice to authors about submitting book proposals and manuscripts to university presses.

The Future of First Books

Friday, October 3, 2014

With speakers:

Brett Bobley, CIO of the National Endowment for the Humanities and director of the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities
Rikk Mulligan, Program Officer for Scholarly Publishing at the Association of Research Libraries and ACLS Public Fellow
Greg Britton, editorial director of Johns Hopkins University Press
and moderator Richard Brown, director of Georgetown University Press

The aim of this symposium was to identify current initiatives supporting the publication of first books in the humanities and social sciences and to analyze and assess which initiatives hold promise and why.

Read more about scholarly mongraph publishing.

Communicating Scholarship in the 21st Century

Friday, April 11, 2014

With speakers:

Jeff Collmann, Ph.D., Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, Georgetown University (formerly at the Georgtown Law O'Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law)
Ranit Mishori, M.D., M.H.S., Global Health Initiative, Department of Family Medicine, Georgetown University School of Medicine
George E. Shambaugh, IV, M.I.A., M.Phil, Ph.D., Associate Professor of International Affairs and Government, Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, (former Chairman of the GU Dept. of Government)
Francis Slakey, Ph.D., Co-Director, Science in the Public Interest (SPI), Upjohn Lecturer on Physics and Public Policy, Georgetown University
and moderator Carol Benedict, Ph.D., Professor and Department Chair, Department of History

This symposium addressed the pressing question of how academic disciplines endure and evolve, and how scholarship is communicated across generations.

Scholarly Uses of the Internet in Science

Friday, November 1, 2013

With panelists Professor Anne Rosenwald, Department of Biology,
Professor Lisa Singh, Department of Computer Science,
and moderator Professor Janet Mann, Departments of Biology and Psychology, Vice Provost for Research

This symposium brought together a panel of experts in computer science and biology to discuss the ways that scientists use the Internet to create knowledge, disseminate and share data and communicate ideas, opinions and concepts. With examples from their own experience, the panelists highlighted some of the greatest opportunities and challenges new technologies offer the sciences.  They also explored the issue of whether the use of the Internet for scholarly communication in science differs from its use in the social sciences or humanities.

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